Angrboda Devotional – Call For Submissions

Working Title: Mother of Wolves, Mother of Monsters: Devotions for Angrboda, Hag of the Ironwood

Edited by Úlfdís

The giantess old | in Ironwood sat,
In the east, and bore | the brood of Fenrir;
Among these one | in monster’s guise
Was soon to steal | the sun from the sky.
Voluspo Stz 40, Bellows

Angrboda: Her name translates as “Bearer of Woe”, “She Who Brings Sorrow” and most ominously, “Foreboding.” Known in the primary sources as Loki’s wife and mother of their three terrifying children, Hel, Fenris and The Serpent, and believed by many to be the Seeress Odin raised from her mound, she is also one of the Mothers in the Rokkr pantheon (having literally given birth to many of them), a völva , and a mighty Chieftain. Feared by some, misunderstood by many, and deeply loved by those who know themselves to be Hers, Angrboda is nothing if not fierce.

I am seeking poems, prayers, essays, rituals and other written pieces honoring Angrboda, Her family and kin, exploring her relationship with other entities in the Nine Worlds, personal experiences with Herself including UPG/PCPG, and anything else related to Angrboda for a devotional anthology.

Please email submissions no later than: 2/1/2020 to: Ulfdis@Ironwoodwitch.com as a PDF or in GoogleDocs.  Submission should include the subject line format: Devotional Submission – ‘Title of your work’

Contributors will receive a PDF copy of the book, and will retain ALL rights to their pieces, and can use them as they will after publication. Contributors will eventually have to provide a legal name/mailing address for sending a release form, but will be credited in print by whatever name they request, or anonymously if they prefer.

Proceeds of the book will be donated to the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. The Sylvia Rivera Law Project works to guarantee that all people are free to self-determine gender identity and expression, regardless of income or race, and without facing harassment, discrimination or violence.

Submission Deadline: 2/1/2020

 

Please feel free to share this request with a link back to this original post.

Waiting

I am a woman waiting for an apocalypse
One day, my howling children will pluck the stars from the sky
They will consume their heavenly bodies
and shit stardust for Aftertimes.

I am a woman waiting for an apocalypse
One day my erstwhile lover will captain a ship of the Dead to battle
They will fight the einherjar; dead will fight dead will fight dead
and my lover will kill, and be killed by his old foe.

I am a woman waiting for an apocalypse,
One day, the sea will roil with rage, my serpentine child rearing up for Revenge
Their life will be lost,
but Thor will fall dead within Nine steps.

I am a woman waiting for an apocalypse,
One day, the Chaos I bore will free himself, eyes blazing, jaws wide to catch up
the One Eyed One, swallowed whole
before he himself is torn asunder

I am a woman waiting for an apocalypse
One day, my daughter will open the gates wide
She will welcome her siblings, and
the dead will march back down the Hel-road home again

I am a woman waiting for an apocalypse,
One day, the crowing of Fjalar will rouse my children to the final battle.
Then, all debts will be paid,
In full, and in Blood.

I am a woman, waiting for an apocalypse,
One day, all I have seen will come to pass.
I bide my time in the East, with my wild children,
honing the blade of my knife.

I am a Woman.
Waiting for the Apocalypse.

—-
Creative Commons License
Waiting by Úlfdís is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

The Road to Hel

I wrote this just over a year ago, and wanted to share it again.

Ironwood Witch

They say “The road to Hel is paved with good intentions.”

(Yes)

(And Intestines, the restless writhing mess,
it is paved with the teeth of the dead
from mouths made sour by words unsaid

Its paved with the sharp shins,
the straight spines shattered,
the knee of those who remain unbending

The Road to Hel is paved with the skulls of your enemies
If thy enemies are Cowardice, Shame and Fear
for it is that conquered road which will bring peace.

Its paved with the hands of many
untold ages, lifting you up
guiding you to a long Remembered place.

The Road to Hel is caked with the mud
of ten hundred thousand times ten thousand journeys
and the strange prints of those who came before.

Its lit with the stories
of the walks to this door:

“Life is a slow march towards Death”

and

“You have gone nowhere Someone hasn’t walked before”

and…

View original post 34 more words

Heathen Holiday Crafts: Rune Ornaments

This one was a lot of fun and super, super easy.  All you need is paint, paper, and string or ornament hooks and glue.

First, you cut the paper, which needs to be stiff (I used watercolour paper) into squares which were about 3×3, and then fold them in half so they open like a book.

ornaments1

Each of the 33 Runes and ornaments was painted individually, in the order they appear. I selected two colours that I associate with each rune, and would first paint the background, then the rune.

In the “front” I painted the runes in the second colour:

ornaments3

And the “back” I painted the name and an image of some kind I also associate with them or which help illustrate the meaning.

ornaments2

After the paint dried, I used a thick sewing needle to make a small hole in the upper corner of the fold, about 1/4 inch from the top and threaded a gold string through. I knotted it and then tucked the ends inside the fold before glueing them together with tacky glue

Put them between waxed paper in a heavy book to help them dry flat – as you can see, Raidho (and Algiz, but it fixed up better) got stuck together.  If you use thicker card stock, you don’t have to double up your paper. I was working with what I had on hand.

In hindsight, I realized that hooks are so easy and cheap to find they had them at the CVS I went to the next day, and were I to make them over again, I would definitely use hooks instead of loops of string, as the loops will break eventually and are not as easy to hang on the branches.

Yule Tradition: Divination

Last year I started a Yuletide tradition for myself that I am continuing this year. I know I saw the idea on someone else’s blog ages ago and I can’t remember where, but I thought it was a fantastic idea for seasonal divination.

Each night of the 12 nights of yule, I draw a rune for each of the next 12 months. I spend some time in meditation, draw a rune, and then journal about it and what it indicates for that month of the year.

I started last night, as it was the Solstice, and historically the Northern folks counted days from evening to evening, not morning to morning so while today is Yule, yesterday was the start, at least for me.

It is a simple thing, but powerful, and last year the tides and themes were on point.

I tweaked a bit from last year, doing more journaling and less focus on dreaming, as I rarely dream (last year I slept on each rune, but had no dreams I could recall). I had also been doing the draws in the morning rather than evening due to my ridiculous work schedule, so I was trying to record one new rune and dream journal from the night before.

The first rune jumped out of the bag. I had my selection between my fingers and half way out the bag when this one dropped on the ground and demanded attention, and glad I am of it – January looks like it will be a surprisingly good month.

gebo by RomOnFire
gebo by RomOnFire on DeviantArt

Recomendation: The Folklore Podcast

I am often either super late to the game with technology, or more rarely, early. In this case, I am very, very late in starting to listen to podcasts. No idea why it took so long, because I am now very enthusiastic about them.

What finally got me was a friend insisting I listen to The Folklore Project, (blog/episode guide here) particularly the Yule episode.

I have always been a fan of folklore, fairytales and mythology, and I always link them together like that because they are ultimately interrelated (including urban legends – aka modern folklore!) and all three have been helpful for informing my personal religious and magical practice, as it has others. For example, the 9 sacred herbs in Anglo-Saxon Heathenry come from a folklore charm!

The Folklore podcast has a focus primarily on European traditions, as that is where the podcast is based, but touches on folklore in the States and other countries as well. Also, host Mark Norman has a fantastic voice. I love listening to him!

I started with the Yule episode, since its that time of the year and I just finished listening to episode 3 today, “Concealed Revealed” about objects found hidden in homes like witch bottles, shoes, etc, and started the episode on the Wild Hunt, which is also very timely as Yule is nearing and Odin will be riding with the Hunt again soon…

A great podcast for anyone who enjoys folklore, and for witches, pagans and heathens with an Anglo-Saxon bent.